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How To: Blanching Veggies

Hi guys! Welcome to another The Basics recipe! I know this is a common practice and is pretty straight forward but I thought some people really need this information! So, today I have for you the simple steps to blanching vegetables. You use blanched veggies in dishes that you want to add them in at the last minute such as stir-fries or even salads. Blanched green beans are found a lot in classic nicoise salad.

blanching vegetables

All you need is some vegetables, salt, water and ice cubes. If you are planning on blanching a few different veggies I would definitely keep them separated and do this is batches. When cutting your vegetables try and keep them around the same size. This will allow for even cooking. It is hard to do with vegetables such as broccoli as pictured below but just do your best.

blanching vegetables

Get a pot of boiling water on the stove. Make sure you boil enough water to submerge the vegetables. Add some salt to the water just before you’re ready to cook the veggies. The same amount of salt you would use while cooking pasta. Place cut veggies into water and stir to make sure they are all covered in water.

blanching veggies

While they are cooking, get a medium sized bowl and fill it with 3-4 handfuls of ice cubes. Add cold water to the ice cubes, enough water that you think your veggies will be fully submerged. Keep this on the side, away from the heat.

 

You want to cook them until they are just tender. I cooked the broccoli pictured for about 6 minutes. If you want, you can test a piece by taking it out of the water with some tongs or a fork and piercing the veggie with the fork. If it has a little give or “al dente” then they are done. OR, if you like them a little more crunchy or less, cook to your desired done-ness. Now, if you are blanching more than one type of veggie, try and take the veggies out of the water with a slotted spoon. If you are only blanching one type then go ahead and strain all the water out.

blanching vegetables

When you cook vegetables this way you insure that they will not continue to cook. Placing them in the iced water “shocks” the vegetables and keeps them exactly at the done-ness you desire. It also helps to keep their radiant color intact. You want to take a strainer and strain the ice cold water. Make sure that the veggies are completely cooled/cold before straining. If you are blanching broccoli or cauliflower you should let it sit in the strainer for a while to make sure all of the water drips out of the crevices.

blanching vegetables

Now, you are ready to add your blanched veggies to any recipe you desire! I hope this helped you in any way and thanks for reading! If you have any questions or wish to contact me for any reason do not hesitate to e-mail me at ThisSillyGirlsLife {at} aol {dot} com

How To: Blanching Veggies
 
Author:
 
I have for you the simple steps to blanching vegetables. You use blanched veggies in dishes that you want to add them in at the last minute such as stir-fries or even salads. Blanched green beans are found a lot in classic nicoise salad.
Ingredients
  • All you need is some vegetables, salt, water and ice cubes.
Instructions
  1. If you are planning on blanching a few different veggies I would definitely keep them separated and do this is batches.
  2. When cutting your vegetables try and keep them around the same size. This will allow for even cooking. It is hard to do with vegetables such as broccoli as pictured below but just do your best.
  3. Get a pot of boiling water on the stove. Make sure you boil enough water to submerge the vegetables.
  4. Add some salt to the water just before you're ready to cook the veggies. The same amount of salt you would use while cooking pasta.
  5. Place cut veggies into water and stir to make sure they are all covered in water.
  6. While they are cooking, get a medium sized bowl and fill it with 3-4 handfuls of ice cubes. Add cold water to the ice cubes, enough water that you think your veggies will be fully submerged. Keep this on the side, away from the heat.
  7. You want to cook them until they are just tender.
  8. If you want, you can test a piece by taking it out of the water with some tongs or a fork and piercing the veggie with the fork. If it has a little give or "al dente" then they are done. OR, if you like them a little more crunchy or less, cook to your desired done-ness.
  9. Now, if you are blanching more than one type of veggie, try and take the veggies out of the water with a slotted spoon. If you are only blanching one type then go ahead and strain all the water out.
  10. Make sure that the veggies are completely cooled/cold before straining. If you are blanching broccoli or cauliflower you should let it sit in the strainer for a while to make sure all of the water drips out of the crevices.
  11. Now, you are ready to add your blanched veggies to any recipe you desire!

 

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14 Wonderful Comments

  1. avatar
    January 23, 2013

    I love broccoli! I didn’t know about the ice!!

    • avatar
      Dale says:
      January 24, 2013

      Thanks, Dana. I love broccoli when it’s a little underdone. When I’m cooking it I usually stop when I think it’s ready, drain it, and then cover it to keep it warm. Then when I’m ready to use it I find that it’s overcooked. Thanks for reminding me to shock it with ice water to stop the cooking process. I enjoyed seeing your recipe for fried rice. Do you have any other Asian recipes? How about dumplings and the dipping sauce or spicy green beans. Those are my favorites. Thanks again!

      • avatar
        January 24, 2013

        I just posted a Honey Garlic Shrimp Stir-Fry just before this recipe, you should go check that one out!

  2. avatar
    January 25, 2013

    Hi Dana! As a newbie cook I enjoyed this post of yours and learnt something useful! Again, as a newbie cook how much salt is ‘pasta salt’? I’m assuming it’s on the lesser side? Or no?

    • avatar
      January 25, 2013

      For this particular recipe it is about a teaspoon. BUT, if you are making pasta you will be using much more water. What I would do is just add a little salt at a time and taste it. If you can taste the salt then that’s enough. Be careful of course because it will be hot!!

  3. avatar
    Gigi says:
    January 27, 2013

    Yummy… thanks. Broccoli is a favorite in our Little Red House…
    XoXo
    GiGi

  4. Thanks for the great tips and thanks for sharing this at What’s In The Gunny Sack!

2Pingbacks & Trackbacks on How To: Blanching Veggies

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